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New Hampshire Tenant Background Check

New Hampshire Tenant Screening

New Hampshire (NH) tenant screening is an important part of the rental process. It helps to ensure that tenants are reliable and financially stable. Landlords can use tenant screening to review credit and criminal history, rental history, and references.

 

Credit Report

 

A credit report is an essential part of tenant screening. Landlords can obtain a credit report from a credit reporting agency, and use it to assess a tenant’s ability to pay rent. Credit reports provide information on a person’s credit history, such as payment history, outstanding debts, and other financial information.

 

Criminal Background Check

 

Landlords can also request a criminal background check as part of a tenant screening. A criminal background check can reveal any criminal history a tenant may have. This can include any convictions, arrests, or other charges.

 

Rental History

 

Rental history is another important part of tenant screening. Landlords can review a tenant’s previous rental history to assess their reliability and suitability as a tenant. This can include information on past payments, the condition of the property, and any disputes between the tenant and landlord.

 

References

 

Finally, landlords can request references from a potential tenant. This can include personal and professional references. This can help to confirm a tenant’s identity, employment history, and rental history.

 

Overall, tenant screening is an important part of the rental process in New Hampshire. Landlords can use it to assess a tenant’s reliability and suitability as a tenant. Through the use of credit reports, criminal background checks, rental history, and references, landlords can make an informed decision on whether to approve a tenant.

 

New Hampshire Tenant Rights

 

As a tenant in New Hampshire, it is important to understand your rights and responsibilities. This guide will provide an overview of the main laws and regulations that you should be aware of as a tenant in New Hampshire.

 

Security Deposit: Landlords in New Hampshire are allowed to charge up to two months’ rent as a security deposit. The security deposit must be held in an interest-bearing account and the landlord must provide the tenant with a receipt. The landlord must also provide the tenant with a statement of the account where the security deposit is held.

 

Repairs and Maintenance: Landlords in New Hampshire are responsible for keeping the rental property in a habitable condition. This includes making all necessary repairs and maintaining the property in a safe and sanitary manner. Tenants are responsible for minor repairs and maintenance, such as changing lightbulbs or replacing air filters.

 

Habitability: Tenants in New Hampshire have the right to live in a habitable rental unit. This includes having access to hot and cold running water, adequate heating, and functioning electrical and plumbing systems. Tenants also have the right to a safe and sanitary living space, free from vermin and hazardous materials.

 

Rent Increases: Landlords in New Hampshire are allowed to increase rent, but must provide the tenant with at least 30 days’ notice before the increase takes effect. If the tenant does not agree with the increase, they can choose to terminate the lease.

 

Evictions: A landlord in New Hampshire may evict a tenant if they have violated the terms of the lease agreement or failed to pay rent. The landlord must provide the tenant with a written notice of the eviction and must also file an eviction lawsuit.

 

Rental Agreements: It is important to have a written rental agreement between the landlord and tenant. The agreement should outline the tenant’s rights and responsibilities, as well as the landlord’s. The agreement should also include the terms of the lease.

 

New Hampshire Landlord Tenant Law

 

The State of New Hampshire has laws and regulations that govern landlord-tenant relationships. These laws are designed to ensure that both landlords and tenants understand their rights and responsibilities and that the relationship between them is fair and equitable.

 

Rent

 

Rent is due on the date specified in the lease agreement. If no date is specified, rent is due at the beginning of each month. Landlords may charge late fees for rent that is not paid on time.

 

Security Deposits

 

Landlords may require tenants to pay a security deposit when they move in. The security deposit must be kept in a separate, interest-bearing account. Landlords must provide a written statement of the amount of the security deposit, the account number, and the bank where it is held. The security deposit must be returned within 30 days of the tenant vacating the premises, minus any amounts that have been deducted for damage or unpaid rent.

 

Disclosures

 

Landlords must make certain disclosures to tenants, including the identity of the person authorized to manage the premises, any known lead paint hazards, and information about utility services.

 

Habitability

 

Landlords are responsible for ensuring that the rental unit is habitable. This includes providing essential services such as heat, water, and sanitation.

 

Evictions

 

In New Hampshire, landlords must provide tenants with a written notice of termination at least 30 days prior to eviction. The notice must specify the reason for the eviction. Landlords can only evict tenants for certain reasons, such as failure to pay rent or violation of the lease agreement.

 

Landlord Responsibilities

 

Landlords are responsible for maintaining the property in a safe and habitable condition. This includes making necessary repairs, providing essential services, and abiding by all applicable building and housing codes. Landlords must also provide tenants with a written notice of any changes to the terms of the lease agreement.

 

New Hampshire Eviction Laws

 

New Hampshire's landlord-tenant laws are designed to protect tenants from unfair or dangerous living conditions and to protect landlords from irresponsible tenants. Knowing the relevant eviction laws in the state can help both landlords and tenants make informed decisions and understand their rights and responsibilities.

 

Under New Hampshire state law, a landlord must provide a tenant with a written notice before they can legally evict them. Depending on the reason for the eviction, the landlord must give the tenant either a 14-day or 30-day notice. If the tenant is being evicted for nonpayment of rent, the landlord must give the tenant a 14-day notice to pay rent or quit. If the tenant is being evicted for any other reason, the landlord must provide the tenant with a 30-day notice to quit.

 

If the tenant does not comply with the terms of the notice, the landlord can file an eviction lawsuit in court. The tenant will be served with a summons and complaint, which includes the landlord’s complaint and a notice of the tenant’s right to file an answer. The tenant will have 20 days to file an answer to the complaint. If the tenant does not file an answer, the court may enter a default judgment in favor of the landlord.

 

If the tenant does file an answer, the court will set a hearing date and notify both the landlord and the tenant. At the hearing, the tenant may present evidence and testimony to support their case. After hearing both sides, the judge will decide if the eviction should be granted or denied. If the eviction is granted, the tenant must vacate the premises within 8 days or the landlord can request a writ of possession from the court to have the tenant removed.

 

It is important for landlords and tenants to be aware of the eviction laws in the state of New Hampshire. Knowing the relevant laws can help both parties make informed decisions and understand their rights and responsibilities.

 


Updated on 2022-12-08 02:51:44 by larry coleman

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